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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Hewing closely to the fiery rhetoric that defined his campaign, Donald Trump during his inaugural address painted a bleak picture of life for some in the United States, promising to end what he called the "American carnage," turn the Washington establishment on its head, give voice to the "forgotten" and work tirelessly to put "America first."

During the campaign, Trump frequently told rally-goers about what he described as the horrors of the inner cities, the tragedy of the education system and the extent to which the United States was being taken advantage of around the globe, offering his leadership as an alternative.

"Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge," he told the crowd. "And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now."

As he also promised on the campaign trail, the buck stops with him.

"From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it's going to be only America first. America first. Every decision — on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs — will be made to benefit American workers and American families," Trump said in his roughly 16-minute inauguration speech, the shortest since President Jimmy Carter's in 1977.

"This moment is your moment. It belongs to you," he said. "It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America."

He pledged to give voice to "the forgotten men and women" and called for a return of power to the American people from the politicians in Washington.

"I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never let you down," he said.

And he sent a warning to lawmakers that he views as ineffectual.

"In America, we understand that a nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk an no action, constantly complaining but never doing anything about it. The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action."

Trump closed his speech with his oft-repeated campaign slogan.

"Together we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And, yes, together, we will make America great again," he exclaimed.

After the inauguration ceremony, the Trumps escorted the Obamas to a waiting helicopter, which will take the former president and first lady to Joint Base Andrews, after which they headed to California.

Trump then signed several documents, including the waiver allowing retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to serve in his Cabinet, while surrounded by his family and political leaders. From there, the group went to the Statuary Hall in the Capitol for a luncheon before the parade.

While making brief remarks at the end of the luncheon, Trump said he was "very, very honored" that Bill and Hillary Clinton attended the inauguration, prompting a standing ovation for the pair.

"I have a lot of respect for those two people. Thank you for being here," he said.

The Trump family left the Capitol in a motorcade en route to the White House. They got out of the vehicle twice, walking for short stretches and waving to the crowds lining the street.

Trump faces a divided nation that is still reeling from the long and contentious presidential race. Hillary Clinton, Trump's general election rival, attended Friday's ceremony and was seated just a few rows behind Trump and members of his family.

Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Immediately after his swearing-in, Trump embraced members of his family and waved to the crowd on the National Mall.

Earlier in the day Trump participated in traditional inauguration customs, such as attending a church service at St. John's Episcopal Church.

Trump chose to wear his trademark red tie, and Melania Trump donned a custom-designed Ralph Lauren sky blue cashmere mock turtleneck dress with a matching cropped cashmere jacket and long suede gloves.

A Pointed Message

Pastor Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas led the service Friday morning at St. John's.

Jeffress is a familiar face to Trump and his eagle-eyed supporters; he appeared with Trump at many rallies on the campaign trail.

"I'm not going to lecture the new president," Jeffress said during an interview with Fox News on Thursday night.

Jeffress said he intends to "encourage" Trump by comparing him "to another great leader God chose."

"[God] told Nehemiah to build a giant wall around Jerusalem to protect the citizens, so I'm going to use Nehemiah's story as an example of why God blesses leaders," Jeffress said.

The service was closed to the media, but the Trump team's social media and senior adviser, Dan Scavino Jr., shared two tweets from the service.

 

'I told you - that you would be the 45th President of the United States, long before the first primary vote...'
Pastor @robertjeffress

— Dan Scavino Jr. (@DanScavino) January 20, 2017

 

 

'History in the making....'
Pastor @robertjeffress #InaugurationDay pic.twitter.com/NpTRqS88mD

— Dan Scavino Jr. (@DanScavino) January 20, 2017

 

Pence also posted pictures, including this one: 

 

We begin this historic and humbling day as we do every day, with a moment of reflection and prayer. #InaugurationDay pic.twitter.com/sfJkGktFpe

— Mike Pence (@mike_pence) January 20, 2017

 

Rundown of the Day

The day’s events followed the pattern of past inaugurations. The Trumps stayed overnight at Blair House, across the street from the White House.

Before the inaugural ceremony, the Trumps sat down for tea with the Obamas; Melania Trump presented them with a box from jeweler Tiffany & Co. Also at the White House were Mike Pence, Karen Pence, Vice President Joe Biden, Jill Biden, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Paul Ryan, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Trump's Cabinet-level picks and former presidents were in attendance for the inauguration.

Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton arrived at the Capitol together. Hillary Clinton, who won the popular vote by roughly 3 million ballots, wore white, a color that holds special significance for the suffragist movement.

Mixing Tradition With Personal Touches

Trump chose two Bibles for his swearing-in: his childhood Bible and President Abraham Lincoln's Bible. The only other president to use Lincoln's Bible was Barack Obama in 2009 and 2013.

Jackie Evancho, a 16-year-old "America's Got Talent" alum, sang the national anthem.

An abnormal facet of the day was the sizable number of congressional Democrats who announced they would skip the inauguration. The latest count had one-third of House Dems boycotting the ceremony. There was no modern precedent for a political boycott of that scale.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Violence flared on some streets of Washington, D.C., on Friday amid Donald Trump's inauguration — with people smashing car and store windows, clashing with police and even torching a limo, leading to more than 200 arrests.

The capital's interim police chief, Peter Newsham, said in a Periscope video posted on Twitter earlier Friday that the problems were caused by one group, "and it's a very, very small percentage of the number of folks that came here to peacefully assemble in our city."

Police said they responded using pepper spray and other control devices.

At least 217 people have been arrested, according to the Metropolitan Police Department, and they were charged with rioting.

Six Metropolitan Police Department officers suffered minor non-life-threatening-injuries, Newsham said at a news conference early this evening. He added that three of the six injured officers suffered head injuries from flying objects.

Thousands of protesters fanned out across downtown Washington in the morning, including some who tried to block security checkpoints to the inauguration festivities.

Protests also cropped up in other parts of the country today, including San Francisco and outside Trump Tower in New York City.

Dramatic video published on social media showed men and women using signs and sticks to shatter glass at a Starbucks and a bank. Police then attempted to chase down the suspected vandals.

Police said in a statement that an organized group marched through the northwestern part of the city around 10:30 a.m. and that "members of the group acting in a concerted effort engaged in acts of vandalism and several instances of destruction of property."

The statement said that the group damaged vehicles, destroyed the property of multiple businesses and ignited small, isolated fires and that police vehicles were among those damaged.

The #DisruptJ20 coalition, named after the date of the inauguration, which promised that its participants would attempt to shut down the inauguration events, tangled with Bikers for Trump, a group clad in leather biker gear that backs the president.

Video on social media showed the two groups exchanging words and blows just before the start of inauguration festivities.

After the inauguration, protesters started a fire on the street, burning what appeared to be garbage and a plastic newspaper stand.

Later in the afternoon, protesters set on fire what appeared to be a stretch limo. Images on social media showed the words "We the people" spray-painted on a door of the vehicle. Smoke from the blaze could be seen streaming into the overcast sky.

Several verbal encounters took place between the president's supporters and protesters. One Bikers for Trump member chastised protesters, according to a report by the Associated Press.

"Get a job," said Rahm, a Bikers for Trump member from Philadelphia. "Stop crying, snowflakes. Trump won."

Outside the International Spy Museum, protesters in Russian-style hats ridiculed Trump's praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin, marching with signs calling Trump "Putin's puppet" and "Kremlin employee of the month," the AP reported.

At the inauguration ceremony, protesters could be seen being removed from the crowd.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri, responded to the protests on Twitter, writing, "Nothing is more unAmerican than protesters who are not peaceful. Disgusting."

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The National Park Service won’t be announcing attendance numbers for President Donald Trump’s inaugural ceremony, but photos of this year’s event indicate that it may have been less well attended than Obama’s in 2009.

There were 1.8 million people who attended Obama’s inauguration in 2009 and close to 1 million who attended his second in 2013, according to DC officials.

Ahead of the day's festivities, federal and District of Columbia officials estimated between 700,000-900,000 people would attend Trump's inauguration.

The D.C. Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency said it was planning for 800,000 to 900,000 people to attend the Trump's inauguration.

Here is a side-by-side comparison of Obama's 2009 inauguration versus Trump's. Both were taken from the same viewpoint: the Smithsonian’s visitor center, called the Castle, looking toward the Capitol Rotunda just an hour apart on the respective days.

The district’s Metro system was less inundated this morning than it was during Obama’s first inauguration. As of 11 a.m. ET, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority says it had recorded 193,000 trips in comparison to the 513,000 trips taken up to that same time on Jan. 20, 2009. Some 317,000 trips were taken by 11 a.m. ET during Obama’s second inauguration on Jan. 21, 2013, the government agency said.

By the time Trump took his oath of office, temperatures were in the mid-40s and approaching the 50 degree mark, according to ABC News meteorologist Melissa Griffin. The sky was cloudy and the rain held off until the 45th president began his inaugural address.

Eight years ago, during Obama's inauguration, it was a frigid 28 degrees Fahrenheit with wind chills in the mid-teens, according to Griffin.

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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- One day after accused killer Markeith Loyd cursed at a judge in a court appearance for allegedly killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend, he came back to court to face the same judge for charges of killing a veteran Orlando, Florida police officer.

Loyd was combative from the start in Friday morning's court appearance for his alleged killing of Orlando police Lt. Debra Clayton earlier this month. He interrupted the judge as she tried to read his charges and refused to answer questions.

Loyd -- appearing with a bandage over his left eye, his hands cuffed and officers holding each of his arms -- said to Judge Jeanette Dejuras Bigney in the state's Ninth Judicial Circuit Court in Orlando, "My name is Markeith Loyd, who are you? Lady in the black dress, who are you?"

Loyd appeared without legal representation. When asked whether he wants a public defender, he again asked for the judge's name.

"State your name for the record," he said.

In connection with Clayton's death, Loyd was charged with first-degree murder of a law enforcement officer, attempted first-degree murder with a firearm, carjacking with a firearm, aggravated assault and wearing a bulletproof vest.

The judge on Friday held him on no bond. Loyd did not enter a plea.

Orlando Police Chief John Mina said that after Loyd first shot Clayton on Jan. 9, he had a clear and unobstructed path to his car but chose instead to run over to where Clayton was. Mina said Clayton was still alive when, he said, Loyd stood "over her defenseless body" and fired multiple shots at her, killing her.

Clayton was a police master sergeant when she was killed. She was promoted to lieutenant on the day of her funeral, Orlando police said.

Loyd was caught by police Tuesday after a nine-day manhunt; he was wanted for allegedly killing Clayton and for allegedly killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend Sade Dixon in December.

When Loyd appeared in court Thursday in connection with Dixon's death, he said to the judge, "Y'all making up s---, like I just went in there and shot this girl, endangering my family ... Y'all portray this s--- to the news people like I just went in there and shot this girl."

While leaving the courtroom Thursday, Loyd said to Judge Bigney, "F--- you."

In connection with Dixon's death, Loyd was charged with one count of first-degree murder with a firearm, one count of unlawful killing of an unborn child, one count of attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts of aggravated assault with a firearm. The judge ordered him held without bond. Loyd did not enter a plea.

The judge said Thursday that Loyd would have a hearing in one week to determine counsel for him in the case over Dixon's death.

Orlando police on Thursday released video of Loyd's capture. In the video -- which was shot from a police chopper above the scene -- Loyd is seen crawling away from a house and toward officers by the roadway. After he stopped crawling, the officers approached him while he lay prone in the street. At least one officer then appeared to kick Loyd in the head. At that point, the chopper camera panned away.

Mina called the camera pulling away "concerning" and said the apparent use of force will be investigated.

Mina said Loyd suffered a fractured left orbital bone and damage to his eye. He was hospitalized until late Wednesday.

When asked at a press conference if kicking the suspect was necessary, Mina said, "The officers were very concerned about what was underneath him. After they handcuffed him and searched him, pulled off his body armor, he had a large bag of ammunition."

Mina called Loyd a "cold-blooded, ruthless killer," and said Loyd's "long and violent history" will be factored into the use-of-force investigation. Mina said that when reviewing the use of force, officers are judged regarding the "totality of circumstances" and that officials will try to determine what an objectively reasonable officer would have done in light of those circumstances.

Officers involved in the arrest are still on full duty, Mina said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- When President-elect Donald Trump takes the presidential oath at the Capitol, with Barack and Michelle Obama watching, the world will witness a transfer of power between two presidents.

Behind the scenes at the White House, the transfer of power between the two first families is already underway as dozens of White House residence staff execute a highly-orchestrated move that will transform the White House to the Trump family’s liking by Friday evening.

"There's a moving van that is positioned in one direction to take the belongings of the outgoing president and first family to leave the White House," said Anita McBride, who served as chief of staff to first lady Laura Bush. "And then you have moving vans and trucks that are pulling in from the other side of the driveway on the south side of the White House that will be ready to unload all of the belongings of the new family."

The transformation of the Obama White House to the Trump White House is executed under the watchful eye of White House chief usher Angella Reid. The White House residence staff are non-political employees who typically serve under multiple administrations.

"All of the residence staff, again, no matter what role that they play on a day-to-day basis...everybody has a job to do on that morning," McBride said. "They have very unique roles in the White House."

Obamas' Goodbye

The residence staff begin their moving duties after bidding goodbye to the Obamas, who lived in the White House for eight years. The first family typically says goodbye to the residence staff in an often emotional farewell meeting early in the morning on Inauguration Day.

"I think for the president and first lady that are leaving, there's mixed emotions," McBride said. "You're gonna miss the people that have been around you, your staff, the residence staff, that have taken great care of you for such a long period of time."

Of the residence staff, McBride said, "They have emotions too to say goodbye but then it's the frenetic pace that happens soon as the current president leaves the front door where they get to work and get the house ready for the next occupant."

Moving trucks have already been spotted at the Washington, D.C., home the Obamas are renting while their youngest daughter, Sasha, 15, finishes high school. Beginning the afternoon of Jan. 20, the Obama family will live outside the confines of the White House gates for the first time in eight years.

After Trump is sworn in, the Obamas, including 18-year-old Malia, will fly to Palm Springs, California, for a vacation.

"Usually there is kind of a swing around, it’s actually quite a moment, the swing around the Capitol where the new president is having lunch with the Congress," ABC News' Cokie Roberts said of the traditional "farewell helicopter ride" for the outgoing first family.

Trump White House

The White House residence staff has a particularly quick turnover to accomplish this year as Trump's inaugural parade is expected to be far shorter than the parades of his predecessors.

White House transformations of the past have included filling the new first family’s closet with their clothes, making sure their favorite foods are stocked and even making sure their preferred towels are hung. This year it remains to be seen what the transformation will include as Melania Trump plans to remain in New York City through at least June so the couple’s son, Barron, can finish the school year.

"The question of how many rooms that they would be redoing in the private residence really is unclear or undefined right now," McBride said. "You know that definitely they will do their bedrooms to their liking and bedrooms for children."

"When [the Obamas] moved in in 2009, the first two rooms that Mrs. Obama did were for her girls and Laura Bush did the same thing for her girls," she said.

It also remains unclear how much time Trump himself plans to stay at the White House, as he may choose instead to spend time at Trump Tower in New York City or at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida.

The Trumps have free reign to redecorate the private residence on the second and third floors of the White House, but any changes to historic rooms like the Lincoln Bedroom and Queen's Bedroom must be approved by the Committee for the Preservation of the White House.

"One of the most wonderful things about the White House is that it's a living museum, steeped in history but it's constantly evolving," McBride said. "I have heard though when Mrs. Trump came through to see the White House for the first time with Mrs. Obama, that she thought it was beautiful as it is."

"So I think time will tell and we'll just have to see," she said. "Again, it is their prerogative to decorate their private residence and [Trump's] Oval Office the way that they want."

Symbolic Tradition

Regardless of how much or how little of the Trump family's belongings are moved into the White House, the move from one president at the White House to the next is fraught with symbolism.

"It's important to reflect on how crucial this is, these symbols of the transfer of power, even unto the children’s toys, really are for the Republic and for the stability of the Republic," Roberts said. "A lot of it is tradition, and it’s not that old of a tradition, truth be told."

The tradition of moving one first family in while the outgoing first family is moved out began in 1952 when Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower moved into the White House, according to Roberts.

"The Trumans were living at Blair House because the White House was under reconstruction and from there on out pretty much it’s been out with the old, in with the new," she said. "The first families, by and large, have been very kind about saying to their successors, 'Come on in, take a look, measure the drapes.'"

"Certainly Michelle Obama was welcoming to Melania Trump and I assume that the staffs have all been meeting," said Roberts, who has covered every presidential inauguration since 1981.

First Lady's Role

Once the new president is in the White House, it historically falls to the first lady to complete the transition and work closely with the residence staff.

"You’re meeting people who are going to be at your hand for the next four years and if you’re wise, you will take that very seriously and be very kind," Roberts said. "Assuming Melania Trump is in New York City, it’s going to be a much slower process."

The first lady’s logistical work with the move also comes at the same time the media and public are asking what her platforms or causes will be, according to Roberts.

"It’s a hard job and it has been from the beginning, particularly in a situation like this where there’s a lot of political hostility," she said. "Often the first lady’s role, if she’s a good politician, is to bring people together and smooth things over and sort of lighten things up."

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The weather forecast is looking bleak for Donald Trump's inauguration.

Some drizzle or a shower could begin as early as 7 a.m. in Washington, D.C., with temperatures hovering in the mid-30s.

By 9:30 a.m. steadier rain is forecast to move into D.C., but temperatures will be warming up into the 40s.

However, by noon — right when Trump is scheduled to be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States — heavy showers could be moving in with some moderate to potentially heavy rain.

The rain is expected to leave the area by about 1 p.m., when temperatures will be near 50.


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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Less than 24 hours after Donald Trump takes the oath of office in Washington, D.C., to become the 45th president of the United States, hundreds of thousands of people from across the country will descend upon the nation’s capital to participate in the Women’s March.

The march — which will begin with a rally featuring speakers and musical acts — is based on a mission that the rhetoric of the 2016 election cycle “insulted, demonized, and threatened” Americans, leaving communities “hurting and scared.”

Organizers say one of the goals of the march is to tell the new administration that on Day 1, “women's rights are human rights.” Despite the name of the event, leaders have made clear that all are welcome to join, not just women.

Organizing the event began shortly after Election Day with a Facebook post by Hawaiian grandmother Teresa Shook, who asked friends about marching together as women on the inauguration. Her question soon escalated to a Facebook event, which received hundreds of thousands of RSVPs. But the Women’s March on Saturday isn’t limited to D.C. — “sister marches” and rallies are planned in locations as distant as Nairobi, Kenya, and Osaka, Japan, as well as in most major U.S. cities.

The march is billed by organizers as a nonpartisan opportunity for people to “stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families — recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.”

With the event happening on the new president’s first full day in the White House, critics contend the march is a protest against Trump’s presidency, particularly as organizations that opposed the president-elect’s campaign joined as partners. The ACLU, Amnesty International, Emily’s List, Planned Parenthood, GLAAD and the Muslim Women’s Alliance all signed on as the event grew in size.

Before the march begins, a three-hour rally will be held on the National Mall with musical headliners Janelle Monae, Questlove, and Grimes, along with celebrity speakers that include America Ferrera, Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Ashley Judd, Melissa Harris-Perry, and Michael Moore. Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards is one of the keynote speakers at the event as well.

Singer Beyonce has not been confirmed at the event but did post a message to her Facebook page Wednesday writing, “Together with Chime for Change, we raise our voices as mothers, as artists, and as activists. As #GlobalCitizens, we can make our voices heard and turn awareness into meaningful action and positive change. #WomensMarch.”

Her sister, Solange, will be in Washington for the Peace Ball — an alternative event happening at the same time as the Trump inauguration balls.

The Washington, D.C., Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency estimates as many as 400,000 people could attend the march, with over 1.3 million registering on the Women’s March website to join around the world.

The rally in Washington kicks off at 10 a.m. Saturday, starting at the intersection of Independence Avenue and Third Street Southwest in Washington, D.C., just blocks from the Capitol.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — As thousands of people descend on Washington D.C. for the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, months of security planning, intelligence gathering and coordination are coming to fruition to protect lawmakers and the public.

The event, like the pope’s visit and the Democratic and Republican national conventions, is designated as a national security event, which unlocks federal resources and allows Secret Service to assume the leadership role for security.

While there are no specific or credible threats, almost every federal partner imaginable will be contributing to the security apparatus this weekend, including the FBI, ATF, Park Police, Customs and Border Protection, the Coast Guard, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Energy.

The United States Capitol Police Department is responsible for securing the Capitol and the Metropolitan Police Department will be primarily protecting the parade route, while still serving the entire city outside of inaugural activities.

In addition, more than 3,000 police officers from around the country are expected and National Guard troops will be patrolling.

The Planning


The planning process has been going on for well over a year, with various agencies holding tabletop exercises, coordination drills and working to staff the massive security undertaking.

The Secret Service trained for nearly every contingency. In a simulation, agents practiced how they would handle a drone spraying weaponized gas on the president and the crowd, a suicide vehicle attack as well as administering first aid if the president himself is attacked.

“Our number one concern is to keep our protectees and the general public safe and secure during all the inauguration events,” said Brian Ebert, Secret Service Special Agent in Charge.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which will be contributing to air support on Inauguration Day, did test runs around Washington, D.C. in the week leading up to the event to make sure communication systems were functioning.

“With the heightened awareness — the possible threats — we just want to do everything we can to put a stop to that,” a CBP pilot told ABC News' Senior Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas on one of the test flights in a AS350 A-Star helicopter.

The Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) sent personnel to the Democratic and Republican national conventions last year to study the security procedures there, as well studying local demonstrations in Washington, D.C. to prepare for the rallies expected this weekend, some of which has already taken place throughout the city.

“We expect by and large, people come here to exercise their First Amendment rights, that's what Washington, D.C. is all about. In the event we have a few that want to create problems, if they break the law, we'll be able to handle that as well,” said MPD interim Police Chief Peter Newsham.

He added that if something happens in D.C., “it won't be for a lack of planning.”

Security Measures


Law enforcement sources from across government told ABC News that they are utilizing a “multi-layered” approach to security.

There will be visible layers, like physical barriers, checkpoints with magnetometers, bag searches and patrolling uniformed officers, as well as hidden layers, such as plainclothes officers inside and outside of the perimeter, radiation detection and surveillance cameras.

"We talk through and identify and gaps in our training or in our communications. So we plan for those up front. On game day, it is seamless, and that is so important, because real-time information is where it's at," said Park Police Chief Robert MacLean.

Major roads, tunnels and bridges leading to the Capitol and downtown D.C. will be closed.

To protect against a possible vehicle attack, like those that have happened recently in Germany and France, trucks filled with sand will be deployed to block the parade perimeter.

CBP helicopters will be scanning the city tomorrow, looking for any possible threats and will be in direct contact with the Secret Service Command Center.

On the Potomac River, Coast Guard cutters will be patrolling the waters and shoreline.

“There's lots of water that runs in or near the nation's capital. It's kind of a threat that's not well-known, but one that has to be protected,” said Coast Guard Capt. Lonnie P Harrison Jr.

Due to the forecast of rain tomorrow, the National Park Service today revised its “no umbrella” policy. "Totes"-style umbrellas that collapse will be allowed on the parade route as well as the National Mall for the inauguration, according to NPS. However, long, non-collapsible umbrellas will not be allowed. All umbrellas are still banned from the U.S. Capitol.

Potential Threats


The FBI and local law enforcement say there are no known, credible threats to the inaugural activities at this time, according to the FBI and local law enforcement.

However, security chiefs are adapting to the ever-evolving global threat environment.

The “lone-wolf threat is “very high among our concerns,” said Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI Washington Field Office Paul Abbate in an interview with ABC News.

These are people who are by definition, operating alone and often don’t pop up on the radar of law enforcement until it’s too late.

Over the past couple of years, there have been more and more actors inspired by larger terrorist organizations, like ISIS, but not directly connected to them.

“We're on the lookout for that each and every day,” said Abbate.

Law enforcement officers urge the public to remain vigilant and report anything suspicious, whether it’s an unidentified package or a person’s behavior.


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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) --  As suspected Orlando cop killer Markeith Loyd was captured, police chopper video showed that he was crawling on the ground towards a group of officers, after which he appeared to be kicked in the head by at least one officer.

Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month and for allegedly killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend in December, was armed with two handguns when he was caught late Tuesday, according to Orlando police. One of the guns was a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition. He had been on the run for nine days.

In the video of his capture -- which was shot from a police chopper above the scene -- Loyd is seen crawling away from a house and toward officers by the roadway. After he stopped crawling, the officers approached him while he lay prone in the street. At least one officer then appeared to kick Loyd in the head. At that point, the chopper camera panned away.

Orlando Police Chief John Mina today called the camera pulling away "concerning" and said the use of force will be investigated.

When asked if kicking him was necessary, Mina said, "the officers were very concerned about what was underneath him. After they handcuffed him, and searched him, pulled off his body armor, he had a large bag of ammunition."

The police said that, while the case involving Clayton's murder is an ongoing investigation, they decided to release this video.

The capture happened late Tuesday after Loyd tried to escape through the back door of a home and was confronted by a group of police; Loyd ran back inside, then came out through the front door, where more police were waiting for him, Mina said.

Loyd was holding two handguns and wearing body armor, Mina said. He said that Loyd crawled towards the officers, did not comply with the officers requests and the "officers used force." Loyd dropped the weapons at some point, Mina said, but the specific timing is not clear.

Mina said Loyd suffered a fractured left orbital bone and damage to his eye. The accused murderer was hospitalized until late Wednesday.

 Mina said Loyd "has a long and violent history" that will be factored into the use of force investigation. Mina said officers are judged regarding the "totality of circumstances" when they look at use of force; officials will try to determine what an objectively reasonable officer would have done in light of those circumstances that night.

Officers involved in the arrest are still on full duty, Mina said.

Loyd, whom Mina called a "cold-blooded, ruthless killer," was first wanted in December for the death of his former girlfriend and her unborn child, the police said. Loyd also allegedly shot and injured the former girlfriend's brother, police said.

Then, on Jan. 9, Loyd allegedly shot and killed Sgt. Clayton, who was a wife, mother and veteran Orlando officer. Mina said today that after Loyd first shot Clayton, he had a clear and unobstructed path to his car, but he chose to run over to where Clayton was. Mina said Clayton was still alive; Mina said Loyd stood "over her defenseless body" and fired multiple shots at her, killing her.

Prosecutors announced Thursday night the charges against Loyd in relation to Sgt. Clayton's murder: First-degree murder, attempted first-degree murder with a firearm, carjacking with a firearm, aggravated assault and wearing a bulletproof vest.

In connection with the death of his former girlfriend, Loyd was charged with one count of first-degree murder with a firearm, one count of unlawful killing of an unborn child, one count of attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm. The judge today set no bond for Loyd's first three charges and set bond at $1,500 for each of the two aggravated assault charges. Loyd did not enter a plea.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) --  Friday is Inauguration Day, and many may be wondering what kind of weather Washington, D.C. will see, since it is mid-January, after all.

Well, the good news is temperatures will not be harsh or frigid; they will be on the mild side for the middle of winter, with highs nearly reaching 50 degrees. That means there are no worries of snow, ice or dangerous winter conditions. The bad news is there is a chance of rain throughout much of the day.

Inaugural celebrations begin at 9:00 a.m. Temperatures will be at their coldest of the day, in the upper 30s, but gradually rising. A brief hit of rain is possible right before and just at the start of the ceremony.

By noon, temperatures are up to the mid 40s, approaching that mild 50 degree mark. After a brief lull in the rain for the mid-morning hours, steadier rain moves in around noon.

Moderate rain is possible from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. After 3 p.m., some brief heavy downpours are possible, just as the parade is about to start. The beginning of the parade may be a bit soggy, but shortly after, the rain should clear up and the rest of the afternoon and evening look dry.

This certainly is not the worst weather that ever happened on Inauguration Day. As recently as eight years ago, for Barack Obama's first inauguration, it was a freezing 28 degrees with wind chills in the mid-teens. Looking back in history, the coldest inauguration was in 1985 when it was only 7 degrees as Ronald Reagan became president. The wind chills fell to -10 to -20 degrees below zero that day.

But it could have been worse. The worst weather for an inauguration was in 1909 when President William H. Taft's ceremony was forced indoors as a major storm continued to drop 10" of snow in the city. The storm began the night before causing downed trees, telephone polls, crippling traffic jams and essentially brought the capital city to a standstill. It took 6,000 men and 500 wagons to clear 58,000 tons of snow from the parade route.

Another terrible, and this time tragic, weather Inauguration Day was in 1841 when President William Henry Harrison was sworn in on a very cold and very windy day. His speech lasted nearly two hours outdoors and he then rode his horse without a hat or coat. After being in such harsh conditions, he developed a cold, eventually led to pneumonia. He passed away a month later.

Severe winter weather is always a possibility in the nation's capitol on Inauguration Day since it falls in January. Although it might rain a little bit on the parade this time around, it could have been much worse.

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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Suspected cop killer Markeith Loyd -- who was caught Tuesday after a nine-day manhunt in Orlando, Florida -- cursed at the judge in a profanity-laced first appearance in court Thursday morning.

Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month, was in court Thursday charged with killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend Sade Dixon in December. He told the judge he wants to represent himself in the court proceedings involving Dixon’s alleged murder. Loyd has not yet been charged in connection with Sgt. Clayton’s murder.

Loyd appeared Thursday with a bandage over his left eye, with his hands cuffed and with officers holding each of his arms.

In the murder suspect's profanity-laced tirade, he said to the judge about Dixon's murder, "Ya'll making up s--- like I just went in there and shot this girl, endangering my family. ... Ya'll portray this s--- to the news people like I just went in there and shot this girl."

"Ya'll been making up s--- the whole time," he said.

Loyd claimed he was beaten by police when authorities captured him as he tried to flee a home on Tuesday.

"They done took my eye. Broke my nose, broke my jaw," Loyd said. "Said I resisted, but I crawled out to the m--- f--- road. ... I didn't resist s---."

While leaving the courtroom, Loyd said to Judge Jeanette Dejuras Bigney, "F--- you."

Before Sgt. Clayton, who was also a wife and mother, was shot to death on Jan. 9, Loyd was wanted for the death of his former girlfriend Dixon and her unborn child, officials said. Loyd also allegedly shot and injured the former girlfriend's brother, officials said.

Charges against Loyd in connection with the Dixon case were read Thursday in court: one count of first-degree murder with a firearm, one count of unlawful killing of an unborn child, one count of attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm.

The Orlando Police Department said Loyd has not yet been charged for Sgt. Clayton's murder; the police expects that to happen this week.

Sade Dixon's mother, Stephanie Dixon-Daniels, said at court Thursday that she never liked Loyd and said he has no respect for law enforcement.

The judge on Thursday set no bond for Loyd's first three charges and set bond at $1,500 for each of the two aggravated assault charges. The judge said Loyd will have a determination of council hearing in one week. The judge also ordered Loyd not to contact his ex-girlfriend's family.

When Loyd was caught Tuesday, he was wearing body armor and carrying two handguns, including a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition, Orlando Police Chief John Mina said. Loyd threw the guns to the ground and resisted arrest when police officers tried to detain him, police said.

Loyd suffered minor injuries in the scuffle with police and was kept at the Orlando Regional Medical Center until late Wednesday, police said.

The arresting officer's use of force will be investigated, per standard procedure, Mina said.

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ABC News/Jacksonville Sheriff's Office(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) -- The South Carolina woman accused of kidnapping a newborn baby from a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998 allegedly admitted to the crime over a year ago, according to court documents obtained by ABC News. Moreover, the stolen child knew she had been abducted, the documents showed.

Gloria Williams, 51, allegedly abducted Alexis Manigo on July 10, 1998, just hours after she was born at a Jacksonville hospital and raised the girl as her own in South Carolina. Williams allegedly posed as a nurse and told the baby's mother that the newborn had a fever and she needed to take her away, according to Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams.

Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, on Jan. 13 and charged in the nearly two-decade-old kidnapping case.

According to the affidavit for the woman’s arrest warrant obtained by ABC News, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received two anonymous tips last year from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The first tip, which authorities received on Aug. 8, stated that Manigo told her friend that she was kidnapped as a baby and is listed as a missing person. The tip also provided authorities with Manigo’s current name, according to the affidavit.

The second tip, which authorities received three months later, stated that Williams confessed to taking Manigo from a hospital in Jacksonville, saying she had renamed the girl and claims her as her daughter. The tip also stated the two were living in Walterboro, according to the affidavit.

Detectives with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said they interviewed two witnesses who confirmed the anonymous tips, according to the affidavit. The first witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year and a half ago Williams confessed to him that she “stole” a baby from a Jacksonville hospital and that she renamed the baby Alexis Manigo, according to the affidavit.

A second witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year-and-a-half ago Manigo told her that she had been kidnapped from a hospital in Jacksonville when she was a baby. According to the witness, Manigo said Williams told her she was named Kamiyah Mobley at birth, the affidavit said.

ABC News chief legal affairs anchor Dan Abrams said it’s unlikely Manigo will be charged in the case if she was in fact aware of her own abduction and chose not to report it to police.

“She’s a victim,” Abrams said on ABC’s Good Morning America Thursday. “She was stolen away from a hospital, she was brought up by the only mother that she knew, so you have to sympathize with her plight.”

Williams was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday, according to the Jacksonville sheriff. She returned to Jacksonville for her first court hearing Wednesday morning, where a judge set no bond on the kidnapping charge but set bail at $503,000 on the interference with custody charge, citing the unique circumstances and the gravity of harm alleged by prosecutors.

Williams is next scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 8.

On Jan. 10, Jacksonville detectives arrived in Walterboro and determined that a birth certificate and social security card for Manigo were fraudulent. The social security number listed with Manigo’s name was issued to a male in Virginia, who died in 1983, according to the affidavit.

DNA testing showed that Manigo, now 18, was not Williams' biological daughter. Oral swabs recently submitted by Manigo were compared to DNA samples that had been collected and preserved from Manigo's birth. The result was a positive match, according to the affidavit.

Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, was reunited with her biological mother and father last week. She appears to be a normal 18-year-old in good health, according to the Jacksonville sheriff.

However, in an exclusive interview that aired Wednesday morning on GMA, Manigo said the reunion was bittersweet because the woman she knows as “mom” was taken away from her.

"I understand what she did was wrong, but just don’t lock her up and throw away the key," Manigo said. "I still think of her as mom, she will always be 'mom.’”

Manigo identified herself during the interview as "Alexis Manigo," but she said she is fine with people calling her by her birth name. She said Williams was "a great mother.”

"She made one mistake, but I was loved," Manigo said. "From that one mistake, I was given the best life."

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Bob Levey/Getty Images for U.S. Fund for UNICEF(HOUSTON) -- Former first lady Barbara Bush is being treated for bronchitis, family spokesman Jim McGrath told ABC News Thursday.

Barbara Bush, 91, entered Houston Methodist Hospital Wednesday morning as a precaution after suffering fatigue and coughing. She had not been feeling well for a couple of weeks but is resting comfortably, McGrath said Wednesday.

McGrath said the former first lady reported feeling "1,000 percent better" Thursday morning.

"Antibiotics and some good rest seem to have restored her to better health," McGrath said in a statement Thursday.

It's unclear when she will be released from the hospital.

Her husband, former President George H.W. Bush, has been hospitalized at the same medical center since Saturday. He was transferred to the intensive care unit Wednesday for "an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia," McGrath said in an initial statement.

The 92-year-old former president underwent a procedure “to protect and clear his airway that required sedation,” the statement said. George H.W. Bush remained in the ICU in stable condition Thursday, according to the family spokesman.

"His medical team is actively evaluating him for extubation, and we are hopeful he will be discharged from the ICU in a few days," McGrath said in a statement Thursday.

Doctors initially believed the 41st president would be allowed to return home later this week after several days of treatment, but his stay was extended. An earlier statement from the family spokesman had said there was no timetable for his release.

During his final presidential news conference Wednesday afternoon, President Obama said he had been in touch with the family about the Bushes' conditions.

"They have not only dedicated their lives to this country. They have been a constant source of friendship and support and good counsel for Michelle and me over the years," Obama told reporters. "They are as fine a couple as we know, and so we want to send our prayers and our love to them. Really good people."

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iStock/Thinkstock(MOUNT HOLLY, N.C.) -- The residents of Mount Holly, a town in North Carolina, have been puzzled by a mysterious "loud boom" that reportedly shook several homes earlier this week.

The Mount Holly Police Department "received more than 30 calls from various parts of the city and even neighboring communities" about the noise on Tuesday evening, said Chief of Police Don Roper.

"People were saying they heard a very loud boom or explosion or loud bang, and some folks said it shook their houses and rattled the windows," Roper told ABC News Thursday.

"It sounded like a bomb just went off outside our house," one caller said, according to 911 audio obtained by ABC's affiliate WSOC in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Several officers immediately went out that night to check areas where callers reported hearing the sound, according to Roper.

But they found "nothing," he said. "There was no evidence of any type of injuries or damage."

There have been several other reports of similar loud noises in the area this past week, Roper said.

One was identified as a train releasing its air brakes and another was an "atmospheric disturbance" -- but what caused the "loud boom" on Tuesday evening remains a mystery, Roper said.

"There's certainly been a lot of chatter and theories on social media, but we weren't able to confirm anything," he said. "We do want people to know we do not feel there is any danger or cause for concern."

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Twitter/@FLOTUS(WASHINGTON) — With just hours remaining until Michelle Obama goes from being first lady to mere mortal, she took to her social media accounts Wednesday to bid adieu to her soon-to-be former life.

"Being your First Lady has been the honor of a lifetime. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. -mo," the first lady wrote on her Twitter and Instagram accounts alongside a photo of her and the president with their arms around each other. Shot from behind, the first couple are looking toward the Washington Monument from a White House balcony.

Being your First Lady has been the honor of a lifetime. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. -mo pic.twitter.com/pahEydkZ5Z

— The First Lady (@FLOTUS) January 19, 2017

Prior to posting the photo of her and the president, Michelle Obama tweeted a 30-second video of herself taking one last stroll through the White House with the first pooches, Bo and Sunny.

"Taking it in on one last walk through the People's House," reads the tweet.

Taking it in on one last walk through the People's House. pic.twitter.com/uaAn6j8Ygy

— The First Lady (@FLOTUS) January 18, 2017

The trio begin their stroll in the Cross Hall, and meander through the South Portico side of the first floor, then to the East Room, Green Room, Blue Room and Red Room,

White House photographer Pete Souza also took to his Instagram account Wednesday, posting a photo of the president giving his final press conference before leaving office. In the photo, Obama is seen waving to the pool of reporters. "Waving goodbye at the conclusion of his last press conference as President earlier today," Souza wrote.

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